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Coats of Arms: Coat of Arms, Ecclesiastical Heraldry, Coats of Arms of U.S. Infantry Regiments, List of Irish Counties Coats of Arms Source Wikipedia

Coats of Arms: Coat of Arms, Ecclesiastical Heraldry, Coats of Arms of U.S. Infantry Regiments, List of Irish Counties Coats of Arms

Source Wikipedia

Published September 4th 2011
ISBN : 9781157632320
Paperback
42 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 41. Chapters: Coat of arms, Ecclesiastical heraldry, Coats of arms of U.S. Infantry Regiments, List of Irish counties coats of arms, Brodie, Coats of arms of U.S. Armor and Cavalry Regiments, Coats of arms of U.S. Army units, Coats of arms of U.S. Army Aviation Regiments, Addington-Barker coat of arms, Carpenters Arms, Surya Majapahit, Crest of Brunei, Bargon, Goggin coat of arms, Coat of arms of Galmudug, Coat of Arms of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. Excerpt: Ecclesiastical heraldry is the tradition of heraldry developed by Christian clergy. Initially used to mark documents, ecclesiastical heraldry evolved as a system for identifying people and dioceses. It is most formalized within the Catholic Church, where most bishops, including the Pope, have a personal coat of arms. Clergy in Anglican, Lutheran, Eastern Catholic, and Orthodox churches follow similar customs, as do institutions such as schools and dioceses. Ecclesiastical heraldry differs notably from other heraldry in the use of special insignia around the shield to indicate rank in a church or denomination. The most prominent of these insignia is the low crowned, wide brimmed ecclesiastical hat, commonly the Roman galero or Scottish Geneva Bonnet. The color and ornamentation of this hat carry indications of rank. Cardinals are famous for the red hat, but other offices and other churches have distinctive hat colors, such as black for ordinary clergy and green for bishops, customarily with a number of tassels increasing with rank. Other insignia include the processional cross, the mitre and the crosier. Eastern traditions favor the use of their own style of head gear and crosier, and the use of the mantle or cloak rather than the ecclesiastical hat. The motto and certain shapes of shields are more common in ecclesiastical heraldry, while supporters and crests ar...