Home » Epistles Book II, and Epistola Ad Pisones, or Art of Poetry by Horace
Epistles Book II, and Epistola Ad Pisones, or Art of Poetry Horace

Epistles Book II, and Epistola Ad Pisones, or Art of Poetry

Horace

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230380490
Paperback
38 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...crocos, and Martial,MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...crocos, and Martial, ix. 39, Lubrica Corycio quamvis sint pulpita nimbo, this Corycian shower being perfume obtained from the crocus of Mount Corycus in Cilicia. Virg. G. iv. 127. Peramlndet. Horace is clearly speaking only of the character of his plays, not of his halting gait from which he received the nickname Atta. 82 JEsonis, Roseiui. Claudius jEsopus, a freedman of some member of the Clodian gens, was a tragic actor of high reputation. Q. Roscins was a comic actor. Both were friends of Cicero, and both amassed great wealth. Cf. Sat. ii. 3, 239. Saliare Numm carmen. The Salii are said to have been established by Numa (cf. line 26, note) on the Palatine Hill as priests of Mars Gradivus, Liv. i. 20. They were twelve in number. A similar college is said to have been placed on the Quirinal by Tullus Hostilius for the service of Quirinus, or Romulus. Their hymns, cailedaxamcnta (a word, the etymology of which is not known), are said by Qninctilian to have been so archaic that the members of the college had little idea of D Line their meaning. In Virgil, JEn. viii. 285, the Salii are priests of Hercnles.!)2 Tercret, in reference to constantperusal. Cf. Cic. ad Fnm. ix. 25, 1, iraiSelav Kvpov... contriveram legendo (Orelli). 93-100 This is manifestly meant as a summary of Athenian history after the close of the struggle with Persia. So far as regards the wonderful growth of art in music, painting, sculpture, architecture, and of the adornments and luxuries of life which this growth could not fail to bring with it, the picture here drawn is fair enough. Whether this process is to be looked upon as one of trifling and folly (nngari, 1. 92) is another question, which Grote answers in the negative.!)5 Athletarum. The Greek athletes was.